Dear Dr. K; Are you personally going to take the coronavirus vaccine?

Dear Dr. K; Are you personally going to take the coronavirus vaccine?

Yes. And let me tell you why.  In 1720 the average life expectancy in this country was 25.  A hundred years later in 1820 it was 41.  Then in 1920 it hit 54.  Currently it is in the mid-70’s.  Despite all the marvels of modern medicine from antibiotics, to trans-vascular heart surgery, to organ transplantation, the major reasons for this improvement in life expectancy boil down to the big three S’s:  sanitation, shoes, and shots.

It is hard to believe but the “why didn’t I think of that” realization that the sources of drinking water should be kept separate from human and animal waste is very recent.  It came with the scientific discovery of microbes (viruses and bacteria) and how they are transmitted.

Then the universal use of footwear came into play.  Prior to that innovation a majority of humans went bare-footed for at least part of the year depending on climate.  As a result, most humans picked up worm infestations through their bare feet that found their way to the intestinal tract: hookworms primarily, but also other species.  Once the worms set up housekeeping in the GI tract, they were there to stay (until the person died).  Their presence affected health in two ways: reducing available calories and vitamins from food intake, and by causing chronic anemia. 

The final “S” is shots, as in vaccines.  In 1798 Edward Jenner developed smallpox vaccination.  About 90 years later Louis Pasteur, often called the father of immunotherapy, developed anthrax and rabies vaccines.  It wasn’t until 1924 that Emil Von Behring developed the tetanus vaccine.  The polio pandemic was stopped in 1955 when Jonas Salk developed the polio vaccine.  Prior to vaccines, those five diseases killed countless millions of children and adults. 

It all comes down to the old adage of “an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure”.  Sanitation, shoes, and shots all work by preventing illness.  So, yes, I will get the coronavirus vaccine. 


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