Jellyfish Allergy

Jellyfish Allergy

Floridians need to be aware that jellyfish can not only be a source of an unpleasant sting, but also of allergic reactions.   In fact, life threatening allergy (anaphylaxis) was first described in 1901 by two scientists; Charles Richet and Paul Portier who were studying jellyfish.  They began their studies at the behest of Prince Albert of Monaco who was an avid oceanographer.  He asked them to study the sting of the Portuguese man-of-war.   They used the venom from both the…

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Dear Dr. K; When I recently started taking Coreg for newly diagnosed hypertension my previously well controlled asthma got worse. Are they related?

Dear Dr. K; When I recently started taking Coreg for newly diagnosed hypertension my previously well controlled asthma got worse. Are they related?

The short answer is yes, the long answer requires explanation.  First of all, asthma and hypertension are both very common conditions with 9% of American adults having asthma and up to 25% having hypertension.  Certain factors can contribute to both conditions:  stress, obesity, sedentary life style, excess salt intake, and sleep-disturbed sleep.  Correcting these factors can help both conditions. In terms of medications, many of the medicines used to treat asthma and hypertension can act on opposing sides of the…

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High Fat Diet and Food Allergy

High Fat Diet and Food Allergy

Over the past thirty years there has been a dramatic increase in both obesity and food allergy.  In fact, the rate of increase for both conditions has followed the same identical track.  For this reason, and others, scientists at Washington University School of Medicine have done exhaustive research to see if there might be a common cause.  As it turns out a high fat diet is the answer.  The rise in obesity is directly linked to the high fat content…

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PFAS

PFAS

PFAS stands for pollen food allergy syndrome.  It used to be called OAS (oral allergy syndrome) but the new name better characterizes the pathogenesis.  Using highly technical immunologic terms, it is called Class II food allergy.  Class I food allergy refers to the common/classic form of food allergy where sensitivity occurs due to ingesting the food.  In Class II food allergy, the sensitivity occurs from exposure to pollen and leads to cross reactivity with a food.  The symptoms involve immediate…

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Q – Tips: COVID-19

Q – Tips: COVID-19

The two main tests being used during this pandemic are nasal swabs to detect active infection, and antibody tests to detect prior infection.     The nasal swab uses a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) which is a chemical tool that amplifies tiny amounts of nucleic acid to allow detection of viral RNA. Antibody tests fall into two main categories:  detection and protective value. The two main detection assays are for either spike glycoprotein (allows the virus to enter human cells) or…

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New Mobile Check In App!

New Mobile Check In App!

We have launched our new Mobile Check In app. You may download it by clicking the download on the right side of this page, or by scanning the QR Code in the office. You can check in from the parking lot. If you are going to be waiting for your shot in the car just click the box that says “yes, in car” and in the comment section please add the color and make of your car. Of course, you…

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“H4” Antihistamine

“H4” Antihistamine

The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology recently published research on an experimental H4-antihistamine investigated at the University of Hanover.  The research is part of a global effort to find more effective therapies for atopic dermatitis (eczema).  The prevalence of atopic dermatitis has doubled in the past 30 years with occurrence in between 15% to 30% of children and 2% to 10% of adults.  It is characterized by chronic relapsing itching of the skin which develops bumps and scaling, and…

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Dear Dr. K –

Dear Dr. K –

All three of my children have food allergies.  My two daughters have minor symptoms but my son has eosinophilic esophagitis and has had to have his esophagus dilated twice.  Why the difference?  The short and sweet answer is gender.  First off, all food allergy is quite common, affecting up to 15% of Americans at some time during their lives.  The resultant symptoms can vary from trivial to life threatening anaphylaxis (such as severe peanut allergy).  Also, the “target organ” of…

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Cough and Asthma

Cough and Asthma

A recent article in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology discussed current research into why asthma patients cough.  The answer, as it seems to be to many complex questions, is multifactorial.  The human brain is the source of a myriad of protective reflexes from blinking to coughing.  Protecting the airway compels a complex and delicate neural network.  Think about the high degree of neurologic coordination required for swallowing without aspirating, even though the esophagus and trachea lie against one…

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Sounds Good to Me!

Sounds Good to Me!

By: Sasha Klemawesch, MD Do you get misty-eyed every time you’re standing in RayJay, waiting for kickoff, listening to the National Anthem?  Or do other drivers give you the side-eye when they catch you singing R-e-S-p-E-c-T into your air mic while sitting at a red light?  No matter what genre you prefer, everyone has been moved by music at some point.  Cultures throughout history have recognized and made use of this, specifically, sound’s healing power.  For example, aboriginal healers used…

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