Pesticides indicated in increased incidence of food allergies

Pesticides indicated in increased incidence of food allergies

Widely used pesticides and chlorinated water may be contributing to the increased frequency of food allergy.  Researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine have found a strong correlation between urinary levels of dichlorophenols and the incidence of food allergy. Both children and adults who had measurable levels of the chemicals in their urine were much more likely to have food allergy. Dichlorophenols are commonly found in household pesticides, those used on fruits and vegetables and also in chlorinated tap water. The researchers felt these chlorine chemicals somehow weaken the body’s food tolerance, thus allowing the allergy to develop.

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